Jubilant Scenes Across US Airports As Trump’s #ImmigrationBan Loses Again At Appeal Court

A federal appeals court has denied Donald Trump’s request to immediately reinstate his travel ban on seven Muslim-majority countries.

The Department of Homeland Security suspended all enforcement of Mr Trump’s immigration ban following a nationwide locking of the executive order from federal judge James Robart in Washington.

Mr Trump called the order from the “so-called” judge “ridiculous”.

However, the White House said the government would adhere to the court’s ruling until the Justice Department intervenes.

But the ninth US Circuit Court of Appeals in San Francisco denied the Justice Department’s request, and instead asked both the state of Washington and the Trump administration to file more arguments at the start of next week.

The higher court’s denial of an immediate stay means legal battles over the ban will continue into the coming week at least.

Acting Solicitor General Noel Francisco forcefully argued in the government’s brief that presidential authority is “largely immune from judicial control” when it comes to deciding who can enter or stay in the United States.

The Justice Department asked that the federal judge’s order be stayed pending resolution of the appeal, so that the ban can “ensure that those approved for admission do not intend to harm Americans and that they have no ties to terrorism.”

“We’ll win,” Mr Trump said at the start of the weekend. “For the safety of the country, we’ll win.”

In his written order, Mr Robart said it is not the court’s job to “create policy or judge the wisdom of any particular policy promoted by the other two branches,” but rather to make sure that an action taken by the government “comports with our country’s laws.”

Mr Trump’s executive order sought to ban all travellers from the seven countries — Iraq, Syria, Iran, Sudan, Libya, Somalia and Yemen — for 90 days and suspended the US’s refugee program for 120 days.

It also indefinitely suspended Syrian refugees from entering the US.

Meanwhile, Visa holders from the seven predominantly Muslim countries affected by the executive order rushed to board US-bound flights yesterday after a federal judge temporarily suspended the block.

Families shared emotional reunions at US airports last night as Trump’s travel ban remained suspended.

Fadi Kassar (L) hugs his daughters Hnan, 8 and Lian, 5, for the first time in more than two years as his wife Razan (not pictured) looks on after the Syrian family was reunited following a flight from Amman, Jordan, at John F. Kennedy International airport in New York City February 2, 2017. Kassar came to Connecticut in 2015 after being granted asylum. The travel ban came down just before his wife and children were due to arrive in the U.S., but they were among the 872 refugees granted waivers to enter the country because they were considered "in transit" before the ban was issued. Bill Swersey/HIAS.org/Handout via REUTERS
Fadi Kassar (L) hugs his daughters Hnan, 8 and Lian, 5, for the first time in more than two years as his wife Razan (not pictured) looks on after the Syrian family was reunited following a flight from Amman, Jordan, at John F. Kennedy International airport in New York City February 2, 2017. Kassar came to Connecticut in 2015 after being granted asylum. The travel ban came down just before his wife and children were due to arrive in the U.S., but they were among the 872 refugees granted waivers to enter the country because they were considered “in transit” before the ban was issued.
Bill Swersey/HIAS.org/Handout via REUTERS
Banah Alhanfy is greeted by her uncle (R) at Logan Airport after she cleared U.S. customs and immigration on special immigrant visa in Boston, February 3, 2017. Alhanfy's father was an interpreter for the United States in Iraq. REUTERS/Brian Snyder
Banah Alhanfy is greeted by her uncle (R) at Logan Airport after she cleared U.S. customs and immigration on special immigrant visa in Boston, February 3, 2017. Alhanfy’s father was an interpreter for the United States in Iraq. REUTERS/Brian Snyder
The Bay family is reunited after Hamed Bay was separated from other passengers and questioned as a result of the travel ban, at Logan Airport in Boston, January 28, 2017. Hamed Bay, a researcher at Tufts University, was traveling back to the U.S. after visiting his sick father in Iran. REUTERS/Brian Snyder
The Bay family is reunited after Hamed Bay was separated from other passengers and questioned as a result of the travel ban, at Logan Airport in Boston, January 28, 2017. Hamed Bay, a researcher at Tufts University, was traveling back to the U.S. after visiting his sick father in Iran. REUTERS/Brian Snyder
Zabihollah Zarepisheh of Iran celebrates after being released from being held in Terminal 4 for over 30 hours as part of the travel ban at John F. Kennedy International Airport in Queens, New York, January 29, 2017. Zarepisheh had flown from Iran to meet his new granddaughter. REUTERS/Andrew Kelly
Zabihollah Zarepisheh of Iran celebrates after being released from being held in Terminal 4 for over 30 hours as part of the travel ban at John F. Kennedy International Airport in Queens, New York, January 29, 2017. Zarepisheh had flown from Iran to meet his new granddaughter. REUTERS/Andrew Kelly
Italy-based Iranian researcher Nima Enayati holds up his ticket to New York, where he will work on surgical robotics research. He had been blocked from flying to the US last week.
Italy-based Iranian researcher Nima Enayati holds up his ticket to New York, where he will work on surgical robotics research. He had been blocked from flying to the US last week.

Families feared they might only have a small time-frame in which to enter the country and reunite with relatives following Donald Trump’s appeal of the block.

But the US Court of Appeals for the 9th Circuit announced early this morning that it has denied the appeal to issue an immediate stay on the temporary restraining order of the ban.

// indipendent.co.uk / metro.co.uk

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